General Resurrection

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    Abogunrin, Samuel Oyinloye

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    The Language and Nature of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ in the New Testament

    "The resurrection of Jesus Christ constitutes the center of the NT message. The cynosure of Christianity from its very beginnings is the fact that God raised Jesus from the dead. But what exactly happened on Easter morning? Can modern man believe in the gospel accounts of the resurrection of Jesus from the grave? Is the resurrection of Jesus an historical event? If so, is it an event in the actual sense of the word or a mere expression of early Christian faith in Jesus as a divine person?"
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    Craig, William L.

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    Contemporary Scholarship and the Historical Evidence for the Resurrection of Jesus Christ

    After an appraisal of recent scholarship on the historicity of the resurrection of Jesus Christ, Professor William Craig contends that "the resurrection appearances, the empty tomb, and the origin of the Christian faith - all point unavoidably to one conclusion: the resurrection of Jesus".
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    Habermas, Gary R.

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    Jesus’ Resurrection and Contemporary Criticism: An Apologetic (Part II)

    "As noted in our survey of contemporary approaches to the resurrection appearances, the pivotal point is ascertaining the cause of the disciples' faith...The chief purpose for the remainder of this essay will be to determine, by continuing both to investigate and utilize critical methodology, if the cause of the original eyewitnesses' faith can be further ascertained. If such verification is found, it will corroborate the earlier apologetic (which can still be presented in a very strong form) and also serve as a more conclusive refutation of radical scholars who deny that such a cause can be discovered."
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    Habermas, Gary R.

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    Resurrection Research from 1975 to the Present: What are Critical Scholars Saying?

    "During the last thirty years, perhaps the most captivating theological topic, at least in North America, is the historical Jesus. Dozens of publications by major scholars have appeared since the mid-1970s, bringing Jesus and his culture to the forefront of contemporary discussions. The apostle Paul has been the subject of numerous additional studies. Almost unavoidably, these two areas make it inevitable that the subject of Jesus’ resurrection will be discussed. To the careful observer, these studies are exhibiting some intriguing tendencies."
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    Habermas, Gary R.

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    Jesus’ Resurrection and Contemporary Criticism: An Apologetic (Part I)

    "There is widespread agreement among scholars today across a broad theological spectrum that the resurrection of Jesus is the central claim of Christianity...In light of this importance, the major purpose of this essay is fourfold. First, we will describe several contemporary approaches to the resurrection, dividing these into five groups, or models, for the sake of clarity. Second, a more-or-less traditional apologetic for the resurrection will be briefly summarized. Third, a contemporary apologetic will be presented in order to strengthen further the earlier case for the historicity of the resurrection of Jesus...Fourth, we will suggest several areas for future concentration in resurrection studies."
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    Harris, Murray J.

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    Resurrection and Immortality: Eight Theses

    "Rather than attempting to include a cursory treatment of such matters as the Old Testament and intertestamental views of resurrection and immortality or the evidences for the resurrection of Christ, this article will focus attention on the New Testament (particularly the Pauline) use of the terms ‘resurrection’ and ‘immortality’ and their interrelation. A convenient way of raising the relevant issues will be to state eight theses which one may then seek to explain or defend."
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    Harris, Murray J.

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    The New Testament View of Life After Death

    "We live in days of mounting concern about issues relating to human beginnings: Is the human fetus a person? Are there any circumstances in which the termination of a pregnancy is morally permissible? Is it legitimate to conduct experiments on human embryos before they are viable? While the Bible is not lacking in guidance on these matters, it has much more to say about man’s life after death than about his life before birth, about eschatology than about anthropology."
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    Wright, N. T.

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    Can a Scientist Believe in the Resurrection?

    "I know plenty of scientists who firmly and avowedly believe in the resurrection, and some indeed who have given a solid and coherent account of why they do so. I salute them but do not intend tonight to engage with the different ways in which they have presented their case. I want, rather, to explore the fault lines, if that’s the right expression, between different ways of knowing, particularly between what we may loosely call scientific knowing and historical knowing, and between both of these and those other modes of knowing to which we give, very loosely, the names of faith, hope and love...[A]lthough the historical arguments for Jesus’ bodily resurrection are truly strong, we must never suppose that they will do more than bring people to the questions faced by Thomas and Peter, the questions of faith and love. We cannot use an supposedly ‘objective’ historical epistemology as the ultimate ground for the truth of Easter...All knowing is a gift from God, historical and scientific knowing no less than that of faith, hope and love; but the greatest of these is love."
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    Wright, N. T.

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    Jesus’ Resurrection and Christian Origins

    "Historical investigation, I propose, brings us to the point where we must say that the tomb previously housing a thoroughly dead Jesus was empty, and that his followers saw and met someone they were convinced was this same Jesus, bodily alive though in a new, transformed fashion."
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    Wright, N. T.

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    Resurrecting Old Arguments: Responding to Four Essays

    "The author is grateful for the attention given to his book The Resurrection of the Son of God by the four reviewers. David Bryan is right to highlight the Enoch literature as a more fertile source of resurrection ideas than the book allowed for; but he has overstated his objection...James Crossley's counter-proposal-resurrection stories grew from 'visions' which gave rise to the idea of an empty tomb as an attempt to 'vindicate' the 'ideas and beliefs of Jesus'-fails on several counts...Michael Goulder revives the highly contentious hypothesis that the early Church was polarized between the Jerusalem apostles, who believed in a non-bodily resurrection, and Pauline Christians for whom the resurrection was bodily. The claim that Mark 16.1-8 is full of contradictions and impossibilities is rejected. Larry Hurtado warns against downplaying the role of experience both in the Christian life and in describing the devotion and liturgy of the early Church. While cautioning against the use of the word 'metaphor' to mean 'less than fully real', I acknowledge the force of the argument, and suggest the cognitive processes I propose and the devotional life sketched by Hurtado are complementary."
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    Yamauchi, Edwin M.

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    Easter: Myth, Hallucination, or History?

    "That the Easter faith in the Resurrection of Christ is the core of Christianity can hardly be denied. Whether that conviction is rooted in myth, in hallucination, or in history has often been debated. Some have maintained that the Resurrection of Christ is a myth patterned after the prototypes of dying and rising fertility gods. Others argue that subjective visions of the risen Christ were sufficient to convince the disciples that their leader was not dead. Even those who do not doubt the historicity of Christ's life and death differ as to how the Resurrection may be viewed historically. Let us examine the evidences for these alternatives."