Hebrews

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    Black, David Alan

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    The Problem of the Literary Structure of Hebrews: An Evaluation and a Proposal

    "The literary structure of the Epistle to the Hebrews is uniquely complex. In a writing so multifaceted, where topics are foreshadowed and repeated, differences of opinion must inevitably arise regarding the precise divisions of the argument. This essay examines three specific approaches to the structure of Hebrews: the traditional view, which divides the epistle into doctrinal and practical parts; the detailed literary analysis of A. Vanhoye; and the 'patchwork' approach, which follows the changing themes of the letter from chapter to chapter without submitting every detail to one overriding theory of structure. Though each approach has its strengths, Vanhoye's offers the clearest analysis of the epistle. Detecting an intricate theme woven in an intricate style, he sets his analysis on a firmer base as part of a broad literary approach to the epistle."
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    Colijn, Brenda B.

     (139K)

    'Let Us Approach': Soteriology in the Epiistle of Hebrews

    "Much has been written on the Christology of the book of Hebrews. Its soteriology, however, deserves more attention than it has received. Soteriological studies have usually focused on the warning passages and their implications for the doctrine of perseverance. Few attempts have been made to characterize the book’s soteriology as a whole...To explore the soteriology of Hebrews, I will first outline the basis of salvation, then focus on the nature of salvation, and finally discuss the results of salvation, including ethics and assurance."
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    Hebrews

     (115K)

    Hebrews - World English Bible (WEB)

    This is an open source version of the bible based on the 1901 ASV (American Standard Version). This document may be freely distributed, there is no copyright on this translation.
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    Longenecker, Richard N.

     (563K)

    The "Faith of Abraham" Theme in Paul, James and Hebrews: A Study in the Circumstantial Nature of New Testament Teaching

    "The theme of the faith of Abraham is employed by three different NT writers in three quite different ways: by Paul in Galatians 3 and Romans 4, by James in chap. 2, and by the writer to the Hebrews in chap. 11. What I would like to do here is to focus attention on the varied treatments of this theme in the NT, spelling out its circumstantial employment and suggesting some implications that can be drawn for our understanding of the Christian message and for our Christian ministries today. By 'circumstantial' I do not mean to suggest 'incidental,' 'inferential' or 'unessential,' as the word sometimes connotes. Rather, I have in mind 'that which relates to and is dependent upon the circumstances for its specific thrust and form.'"
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    MacLeod, David J.

     (139K)

    The Doctrinal Center of the Book of Hebrews

    "The question of emphasis (or the doctrinal center) of Hebrews, is a vital one. It is generally agreed by interpreters of the epistle that the author did have one 'master idea' to which all other sections of his theology are subordinate. It is important to establish the center (or unifying idea, or major theme) so that the theological materials of the epistle may be arranged in a way that reflects the author's own emphasis. Interpreters are not in agreement, however, as to what the doctrinal center of Hebrews is...The following discussion presents and evaluates the various proposals."
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    MacLeod, David J.

     (166K)

    The Literary Structure of the Book of Hebrews

    "The past 30 years have witnessed considerable discussion over various aspects of the Epistle to the Hebrews. This article and one to be published in the following issue focus on two areas of the discussion, namely, the literary structure of the epistle and the doctrinal center of the epistle. The first of these topics, the epistle's literary structure, is of importance in that it affects one's understanding of how the book is to be dlivided and of the author's development of his argument. This article summarizes the traditional approach to the epistle's structure and then examines contemporary contributions to the discussion."
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    Miller, Merland R.

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    Seven Theological Themes in Hebrews

    "By examining the relationship of literary form to theological argument in the book of Hebrews, seven theological themes occurring throughout Hebrews are elucidated, each of which is especially preva- lent in 11:1-12:2. This smaller section emerges as a theological micro- cosm of the book as a whole. Upon close inspection, these seven themes can be seen to function as a forceful appeal for the readers not to abandon the New Covenant community for the Old, but rather to endure in faith. The faith that brings such endurance is that which focuses on Jesus, the Pioneer and Perfecter of faith, who himself has endured the cross and has sat down at the right hand of God the Father."
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    Osborne, Grant R.

     (166K)

    The Christ of Hebrews and Other Religions

    "In a very real sense, the topic of other religions is the subject matter of the entire NT , since every book to one extent or another addresses the clash between Christianity and the religions that surround it. That is especially true of Hebrews, where the conflict of religions is especially pervasive. This study will attempt to probe this clash and contextualize it for the current situation. First, we will study the situation behind the book, then map the rhetorical strategy of the author in correcting it, especially in terms of the christological solution, and finally note implications for the witness of the church in the postmodern conflict of religions."
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    Rhee, Victor

     (178K)

    Christology and the Concept of Faith in Hebrews 5:11-6:20

    "In his book Der Glaube im Hebraerbrief Erich Grasser argues that in Hebrews faith is not directed to Christ in any way. Grasser believes that faith in Hebrews is seen ethically, as steadfastness only, and not soteriologically. However, a careful exegesis of Hebrews 11 shows that faith in this epistle is as Christologically oriented (i.e., it has Christ as the object of faith) as it is in the Pauline Epistles, even though it is not expressed in terms of 'faith in Christ.' The chiastic structure of Hebrews 11 supports this contention."
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    Scott, Brett R.

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    Jesus' Superiority over Moses in Hebrews 3:1-6

    "Hebrews 3:1–6 compares Jesus with Moses in order to lay a foundation for the exhortation that follows in 3:7–4:11. The comparison points up three important truths. First, the Old Covenant has been surpassed and superseded by the New Covenant. Second, the limited access to God through a human mediator (only Moses was given face-to-face access to God) has been surpassed by the provision of direct access to God for all His people. Third, though both Moses and Jesus were faithful in their positions, the access secured by Moses as a faithful servant of God has been far surpassed by the access to God enjoyed by Jesus, God's Son. The contrast between Jesus and Moses serves as a rhetorical device to persuade the readers to accept the New Covenant, to enjoy their direct access to God, and to recognize Jesus Christ as the faithful Mediator between God and humans."
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    Toussaint, Stanley D.

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    The Eschatology of the Warning Passages in the Book of Hebrews

    "The prophetic portions of the warning passages in the Epistle to the Hebrews contain broad hints as to whom these admonitions are addressed...One great aid in determining the target of the warning passages is the eschatology in these passages. In other words, do the passages threaten loss of reward or the missing of salvation? If the former is correct, the paragraphs in question are addressed to believers; if on the other hand the eschatology deals with eternal damnation or eternal salvation, the passages are aimed at professing believers. It is the thesis of this article that eschatology is a determinative factor in coming to the conclusion that the passages in question are concerned with the danger of apostasy."